Training workshops


An evolving story on MSC-PV in Zanzibar

 Monday 27th July

 The story begins to unfold….

A few women, a few men, they wait patiently for the rest to arrive. Some have travelled long distances from the nearby island of Pemba. Others are already at home. The Programme Coordinator arrives, the workshop can begin. The story starts to unfold…..

 “Introduce yourself by telling us your story about your experience with stories” turns into a real storytelling competition. One story tells us about a lion that marries and finally eats a donkey.  In another story the lion gets trapped into a well by a rabbit. Another person tells us that one night she saw someone in the room holding a snake and letting it crawl over her body. Scared she called for her father to come. He lit the torch but did not see anything, even when being called the second time. She allowed herself not to be scared anymore and to let the snake crawl over her body….. Every story is different. Every story is unique. Story telling takes time, to develop, to share, translate and to listen to.

 The next stories people tell each other are about the most significant change that they have observed over the last 2 years in the lives of farmers involved in the programme. The five stories finally selected were mainly about how knowledge about improved farming practices led to higher production, be it bananas, vegetables or chickens. The one story selected out of these five was selected as the most significant of the five not only because of increased production, but also because of spill over effect to other farmers who learned from their fellow farmers.

 The last stories today were captured on video. Each person held the video camera, briefly interviewed one colleague and captured the response. This was a story about people learning to hold a camera and to use it, some for the first time. It was a story full of laughter.

 

Tuesday’28th July 2009

Confidence is growing

The day starts with reviewing the shots taken by participants the previous day. For some, this was the first time ever they held a video camera. Others were more experienced. Still, one never stops learning.

More exercises during the day were meant to build participants’ capacity to work with the most significant change (MSC) technique and to work with a video camera. We had the ‘show and tell’ exercise, where participants were requested to make a movie of an object they choose. Reviewing this led to a lot of learning about video making, such as ‘use a tripod’, ‘avoid zooming’, the ‘rule of thirds’ and the ‘180 degrees rule’.

The next exercise further developed participants’ capacity in MSC, now in combination with the video camera and with the use of a story board. In groups of five they developed a story board, they told and captured the MSC stories on video, selected the most significant of these and reviewed some of the footage taken. For the selected SC story they developed a story board and took cutaway shots for editing purposes. Again there was a steep learning curve, both in the MSC technique, as well as in movie making. Participants learned fast!

Editing was more difficult and time was really too limited to ‘master’ it. As we needed time to prepare for the field work we decided that editing skills would be further enhance after the field work. And that editing was not going to be part of the field work process, as we originally intended: to edit, together with farmers, the SC story with cutaway shots.

During these two days we have seen people grow very fast in their capacity to work with MSC and with video. Those who were shaking all over their body the previous day when holding the camera, were now confident and knew what to do. We were looking forward to see whether all these effort would bear fruit when working with farmers the next day.

 

Wednesday 29th July 2009

Field work starts and ends with laughter….and farmers share their stories!

We are all excited. We are going to the field! Now it’s time to practice the knowledge and skills that we have gained over the last 2 days. Some last minute arrangements, some last minute adaptations of the process (yes, we are going to film all the stories and not document the full story on paper!) and we are ready to take off. The bus departs and inside the air is trembling.

When everybody is cheerfully chatting away, the ‘mzungu’ is trying to catch up on some Swahili. Let’s start with counting. One, two, three, four…… moja, mbili, tatu, nne … Oh dear, that’s not easy. When trying to say the Swahili word for ‘five’ the whole bus is killing itself laughing… A minor mistake can lead to a word that really you don’t want to be using! Ok., let’s try again, counting up to ten…. Again the bus is in tears! Another minor mistake in ‘ten’ leads to an even more serious disaster! The ‘mzungu’ stops trying Swahili, feeling very embarrassed….. The group is in a top mood!

We have arrived, the real work begins. Workshop participants are collaborating very smoothly in their teams. They each work with one group of some eight farmers. In total there are four groups, two of which have been engaged in a chicken project, the other two groups have been working on cassava. To get people in the mood, some groups get the camera out and ask farmers to hold it, and to interview their fellow farmers using it! There is excitement all over. The ice is broken.

Then farmers are requested to draw a ‘story board’: to draw pictures on cards that symbolize key issues they would like to share in their story. This can assist them in developing and telling their story. The story they are requested to tell is about what they consider to be the most significant change in their life as a result of being engaged in the project. It doesn’t take long before chickens and stick people appear on the cards. The storytelling begins, and so does the video making. As real professionals the farmer field school facilitators work with the camera, some assisted by the real professional film makers from the communication department of the ministry of agriculture, livestock and environment. Some farmers need a little encouragement, others are proud to tell their most significant change story on video. All have a story to tell. And every story is different.

When all stories have been captured, the selection process begins. One facilitator gets participants to draw symbols for themselves – no one could do a better job than the farmers themselves. Then they vote for the one they consider to be the most significant of all stories heard. A discussion around their reasons for choice takes place to learn from each other. Then story which has been selected as the most significant of all gets reviewed: what can be improved in story telling, what additional cutaway shots can be taken? They storyteller again tells the MSC story, now with more information, taking advice from their colleagues on board.

It’s time for prayer. People leave the scene. When they come back lunch is being served. As there is no time left to capture the cutaway shots we decide to go ahead with showing the selected videos to the farmers. That means having lunch and capturing the movies on laptop at the same time! Storytelling takes time, so does capturing them on a computer. Editing is a step too far away – we don’t have the skills yet and time is beating us.

The sun outside is getting very hot, but luckily the nursery rooms are cool. Here the farmers can view the first selected change movies. Meanwhile, we are working hard to capture the other movies on laptop. It just works out fine in the end. Everybody gets a chance to see the 4 stories, and there is a discussion about each movie. Then the selection process begins, through voting on cards. Each of the four selected farmers gets a big clap for their efforts: Yolanda, Hamisi, Vuai and Shami. The last one is selected as the most significant of the four. Like the stories varied, the claps also did, from rain to thunder…..We all go home tired but satisfied.

The day ends with another blunder of the ‘mzungu’ trying the numbers in Swahili. She gives up when the whole bus bursts out in laughter again. The day ends like it began…..

 

Thursday 30th July 2009

Reflecting on and learning from the field work process

The day is settling in, and so is the tiredness of the field work. There is still a lot to do so we do more warming up exercises. We start reflecting on the field work. Some of the feedback of farmers is really encouraging. Even though initially they were a bit hesitant, in the end farmers liked and were even proud to be filmed! And they wanted to see all the movies as each farmer was filmed during their story telling! We agree to go back and also to share the other change movies with them. Feedback is critical for learning and success.

We discuss the whole field work process. The importance of documenting essential information is a big lesson. Another big lesson is that people should not select the story as the most significant one because they know the storyteller very well, because he or she has an important role to play in the group, or because he or she is involved in the same enterprise as them. Facilitation of the selection process is really crucial so that people know how to select. Also getting each person to explain their reasons for choice is important. It is not a tick and go exercise. Also it is not a competition…..

We also learned important lessons about significant changes in farmers’ lives. Such as the woman whose story was selected not because she increased her chicken production a lot (she didn’t), but because she was able to practice the appropriate skills and she set an example to other farmers. Sharing these reasons for choice with other farmers is very important for the learning process. Another farmer explained a negative change as a result of being engaged in the program. He did not have land but could use some land of his brother in law. However, as the farmer and his brother got trained in improved farming practices, the brother in law wanted his piece of land back to practice his newly gained knowledge and skills. As a result of the program, the storyteller gained knowledge but he lost the land he was using for agricultural production. After reflecting on this story, the farmers’ group decided they needed to assist this farmer. Capturing negative change stories is also important for managing impact.

It’s important to be open to unexpected change, as we learned in the process. Whilst many farmers indicated increased production as a result of being engaged in the program, the result of this was different for different farmers.  Some mentioned that now they were able to eat chickens whenever they wanted to, another mentioned many changes but the indicated the ability to build a house as the most significant of all changes.

When participants were asked to review each others’ formats for story collection and for documenting the selection process, they realized the importance of good documentation. There were many gaps, such as not documenting the most significant change or why this was chosen as their most significant change. Practice, review and adapted practice is essential for proper learning.

 The day ended with some looking forward – thinking through system for MSC-PV in the program. We realized that in a program that targets some 7000 farmers it is impossible to capture all stories. We agreed on a pilot. As each of then nine districts in Zanzibar and Pemba had sent one representative farmer field school (FFS) facilitator to this workshop, we agreed to start working with these trained people in the pilot phase. The other trained participants would support them in their efforts, either in terms of facilitation or in documenting the selected stories on video. Particularly the trained participants from the communication department of the ministry of agriculture, livestock and environment would be useful in the filming and editing process. Each facilitator would be working with 6 groups of 5 farmers, selected from the 3 FFS groups they are working with. The SC stories would be captured on paper, and the selected stories would be captured on video.. one story per farmers’ group. This design process was continued the next day…..

 

 Friday 31st July 2009

Ending with inspirations for the future, beginning the story of implementation ….

It’s the last day of the MSC-PV workshop. We have gone through so much together. We have seen each other grow in confidence as we tried, reflected and put our learning into practice in the next exercise. Now it’s time to consolidate our learning and think about the future. How can we set up a system where most significant change stories can be captured? How can we use (participatory) video with this? And how can we set up the system so that it complements our current efforts in M&E? This was what the last day of the workshop was about. We developed a draft system for MSC-PV for the program. This can easily be integrated into the current M&E system. At the end the M&E officer Mr Lada indicated: ‘we feel empowered that we have developed this ourselves!’

We then had time to continue practicing our editing skills. It started with viewing a compilation of video shots, mainly from the field work. This can be viewed at (to be uploaded soon!). The groups then practiced some editing skills on the selected SC story from the farmers’ group they worked with. Even though we were not able to capture the final versions of these edited movies, you can see the unedited versions on (to be uploaded soon!). We agreed that farmers would get a chance to see all the stories as every SC story had been captured on video. In the near future the district resource centres will provide the opportunity for farmers to come and view the films of the SC stories, any time they want. And possibly editing can be done locally. As much as possible the whole process needs to be done as close as possible to farmers’ level, in collaboration with the farm field school facilitators.

The day ended with reflecting on the workshop. Workshop facilitators went outside, and participants facilitated their own evaluation, using an evaluation wheel. Generally people felt empowered to facilitate MSC and use video for this purpose. They would have liked more time: 2 or even 3 weeks! It was encouraging to see people grow in confidence. Some were interested to learn even more about participatory video. And Mr Lada said –  ‘Now we ready to implement and to train the rest of the staff in MSC-PV ourselves!’ And so their story begins here….

Advertisements

Call for applications: Training on Managing for Impact (M4I),
21 September – 2 October 2009, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
Closing date: 31st July 2009

Course Details| Application form – New.

The Strengthening Managing for Impact Programme (SMIP) is calling for applications to attend a training workshop on Managing for Impact. The purpose of this workshop is to continue with developing and strengthening capacity of individual service providers and practitioners within Eastern & Southern Africa to support pro-poor projects to effectively manage toward impact. Specific objectives of the training workshop include:

  • Enhancing the skills and knowledge of service providers and practitioners on what managing for impact means and how to put it into practice; and
  • Identifying service providers and practitioners willing to continue to collaborate with one another and pro-poor initiatives beyond the training workshop through a managing for impact network.

This workshop will be held in Bloemfontein, South Africa from 21 September – 2 October 2009. To apply for this training workshop, please complete the application form and participant profile and email the completed form to keneilwe@khanya-aicdd.org or fax to +27 51 430 8322 no later than 31 July 2009.

Strengthening Managing for Impact Programme (SMIP) is an IFAD Funded Capacity Building Programme. Further details about the workshop are available from the link below:

For full details about this course, please click here……

March MfI Workshop, Nairobi

A ten-day training will be held at Haramaya University, Ethiopia from the 15th to the 25th of September 2008. The workshop is for service providers and project staff interested in developing their skills and capacity to implement the Managing for Impact approach. 

The overall purpose of the workshop is to continue to develop and strengthen the MfI network in eastern & southern Africa to support pro-poor initiatives to effectively manage towards impact.

Specific objectives include:

  •  Enhancing the skills and knowledge of service providers and practitioners on what managing for impact means and how to put it into practice; and
  • Identifying service providers & practitioners willing to engage with SMIP through the MfI network to support pro-poor projects in the implementation of the managing for impact approach

The training workshop draws on adult learning principles. The approach used will be highly interactive in nature, involving both theory and real world experiences; and build on the existing knowledge and experiences of the participants. Participants will apply and reflect on some of the tools they learn about during a field visit in the second week of the course. The course content draws on the conceptual framework that guides the managing for impact approach and includes theories & backgrounds: methodologies & tools related to the following:

  •  Paradigms influencing knowledge & development
  • Systems, Institutions & Processes (SIPs)
  • Creating learning environments
  • Change management/managing change
  • Strategic planning
  • Operationalizing strategic plans
  • Participatory Monitoring & Evaluation

For further information, please visit the SMIP ERIL site

Course focus

Would you like to improve the performance of your project or programme through more effective stakeholder participation, improved planning or more reflective monitoring and evaluation (M&E)? Are you trying to design a flexible programme or project better suited to complexity and uncertainty in rural development contexts or natural resources management? Such challenges are the focus of this course.

The course recognises that “blue print planning” has become unworkable and often counterproductive. Instead, more flexible, adaptive and process orientated approaches are required. M&E needs to be learning focused, and directed towards supporting managers to cope in a complex and rapidly changing world. At the same time, high demands on accountability and transparency necessitate effective planning and M&E systems that also inform funding agencies, governing agencies and other stakeholders on the impact and progress of development projects and programmes and on other specific information requirements each stakeholder may have.

The participatory approaches are critical for: focusing projects or programmes towards needs of clients’/beneficiaries’; developing ownership and facilitating learning amongst stakeholder groups; and adapting the direction of a programme or project in response to lessons learnt. The course focuses on how to design and institutionalise participatory planning and M&E systems in projects, programmes and organisations or networks for continuous learning and enhanced performance. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between management information needs and responsibilities and the planning and M&E functions.

Aims and objectives

New insights about:

·     The principles of participatory and learning orientated planning, monitoring and evaluation

·     Current trends in planning and M&E theory and practice and the requirements of funding bodies

·     Creating a learning culture in teams and organisations

Strengthened competence to:

·     Facilitate participatory planning and M&E processes

·     Design and manage M&E systems that support adaptive and flexible project and programme management in complex, multi-stakeholder environments

·     Provide support in assessing and enhancing impact of the project / programme / organisation / network

Clear ideas for:

·     Improving planning and M&E in your organisation

·     Further strengthening your own competence to facilitate participatory planning and M&E processes.

Application

The deadline for application directly to Wageningen International, with funding other than a NFP fellowship, is    2 February 2009. Early application is recommended. For additional information and online application, go to: www.cdic.wur.nl/UK/newsagenda and click on the course of your interest. 

Mosaic announces the dates for the upcoming July 2008 Summer Workshops on:  1) Stakeholder Participation in: Planning, Needs Assessment, Monitoring and Evaluation; 2) Results-based Management, Appreciative Inquiry and Open Space Technology; and 3) Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation.  

Stakeholder Participation in  Planning, Needs Assessment, Monitoring and Evaluation using PRA/PLA Tools. Held at the University of Ottawa, Canada. July 7-12, 2008

The Stakeholder Participation workshop focuses on core participatory concepts, tools and their application. This is an intensive six-day workshop set in the community to maximize learning, group interaction and networking.  Topics include The Origins of Participatory Development, Learning and Application of PRA/PLA tools, the Application of Participation to Project Design, Monitoring and Evaluation, Developing Effective Facilitation Skills, Building Action Plans and Team-Building.  Two-day community assignments proposed by community-based organizations in the Ottawa region will allow participants to apply tools learned in the workshop to real-life situations.  This is also a great opportunity to network with other practitioners, NGOs, donors, and action researchers from all over the world.

For further information, please refer to the web site at http//www.mosaic-net-intl.ca or by email at wkshop05@mosaic-net-intl.ca

Results-based Management, Appreciative Inquiry and Open Space Technology
Held at the University of Ottawa, Canada
July 14-18, 2008

This popular workshop introduces participants to Results-based Management, Appreciative Inquiry and Open Space Technology.  Demonstrate the effectiveness of your programmes with Results-based Management.  Master what we mean by results, develop programme/organizational plans which are results-based and design performance monitoring systems based on indicators and participatory methods.  You will also expand your repertoire of tools  to also learn about Appreciative Inquiry and Open Space and how they can be applied to your organization, programme and/or project.  These approaches are increasingly being used around the world to tap into new ways to do our work in ways that are more results-oriented, more appreciative and less problem-focused and more self-organized vs top down.

For further information, please refer to the web site at http//www.mosaic-net-intl.ca or by email at wkshop05@mosaic-net-intl.ca

Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation
Held at the University of Ottawa, Canada
July 21-26,2008

Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation (PM & E) involves a different approach to project monitoring and evaluation by involving local people, project stakeholders, and development agencies deciding together about how to measure results and what actions should follow once this information has been collected and analyzed.  This intensive six day experiential workshop is practically focused with daily excursions into the community and a three-day community assignment.  Topics covered at the workshop include Origins of PM & E, Skills and Attributes of a PM & E facilitator, Learning PM & E Tools, Designing a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework, Quantitiative and Qualitative Indicators and Building Actions Plan and much more.  

All workshops organized by Mosaic are sensitive to issues of gender, ethnicity, race,  and class and how these can influence outcomes and  how we see the world if they are absent from our assumptions, direct participation,  our analysis and conclusions. 

Can’t attend the workshops?  Contact Mosaic to custom design a workshop to suit the specific needs of your organization.

For further information, please refer to the web site at http//:www.mosaic-net-intl.ca or by email at wkshop05@mosaic-net-intl.ca. Send your full mailing address for a brochure.

Francoise Coupal and Helen Patterson, Facilitators
Mosaic.net International, Inc.
email: wkshop05@mosaic-net-intl.ca